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Mountain Mandarin Festival returns this week



Booth of mandarin seller at festival
Fresh mandarins will be available
by the bag or box at the Mountain
Mandarin Festival this weekend.
(Photo courtesy Mountain
Mandarin Festival)

Popular event features tons of fresh citrus and more

After a year off, the Mandarin Festival is back!

Starting Friday, enjoy the three-day celebration of all things citrus at the 28th Mountain Mandarin Festival at the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn.

“The 28th Mountain Mandarin Festival will return this year,” the organizers posted on Facebook. “Still following CDC guidelines. Shop the craft vendors, enjoy entertainment, eat fabulous food and take home Placer County mandarins.”

Patrons will be asked to wear face masks indoors. Remember to social distance. The 2019 festival attracted more than 30,000 attendees during its three-day run.

This year, there will be plenty of fruit to enjoy and free samples for everyone. Thousands of pounds of fresh Placer-grown mandarins will be sold during the event as well as countless mandarin-related products.

Scores of farmers and other vendors will be on hand, offering their locally grown fruit and other products. Snack on mandarin-flavored treats. Enjoy live music and performances at the main stage. Take part in special contests such as mandarin juicing.

“Thousands of filled orange mesh bags await and jams, jellies, infused olive oils, balsamic vinegar, barbecue sauces and body care products are all available for purchase,” say the organizers. “Visitors are delighted to discover that the food vendors offer everything from mandarin pizza to mandarin glazed wings, mandarin doughnuts and mandarin pulled pork, just to name a few.”

In addition, Placer County master gardeners will staff a booth on Saturday and Sunday. Get your 2022 Garden Guide and Calendar from them for just $10; for purchases of five or more the price drops to $9 each.

Festival hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19; 9 a.m. to 5 pm. Saturday, Nov. 20; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21.

General admission is $10; children age 11 and younger are admitted free. Seniors: $6. Friday discount admission: $5.

Gold Country Fairgrounds is located at 209 Fairgate Road, Auburn.

For tickets and details: www.mandarinfestival.com.


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Dig In: Garden checklist for week of Jan. 29

Bundle up and get work done!

* Prune, prune, prune. Now is the time to cut back most deciduous trees and shrubs. The exceptions are spring-flowering shrubs such as lilacs.

* Now is the time to prune fruit trees, except apricot and cherry trees. Clean up leaves and debris around the trees to prevent the spread of disease.

* Prune roses, even if they’re still trying to bloom or sprouting new growth. Strip off any remaining leaves, so the bush will be able to put out new growth in early spring.

* Prune Christmas camellias (Camellia sasanqua), the early-flowering varieties, after their bloom. They don’t need much, but selective pruning can promote bushiness, upright growth and more bloom next winter. Feed with an acid-type fertilizer. But don’t feed your Japonica camellias until after they finish blooming next month. Feeding while camellias are in bloom may cause them to drop unopened buds.

* Clean up leaves and debris around your newly pruned roses and shrubs. Put down fresh mulch or bark to keep roots cozy.

* Apply horticultural oil to fruit trees to control scale, mites and aphids. Oils need 24 hours of dry weather after application to be effective.

* This is also the time to spray a copper-based oil to peach and nectarine trees to fight leaf curl. Avoid spraying on windy days.

* Divide daylilies, Shasta daisies and other perennials.

* Cut back and divide chrysanthemums.

* Plant bare-root roses, trees and shrubs.

* Transplant pansies, violas, calendulas, English daisies, snapdragons and fairy primroses.

* In the vegetable garden, plant fava beans, head lettuce, mustard, onion sets, radicchio and radishes.

* Plant bare-root asparagus and root divisions of rhubarb.

* In the bulb department, plant callas, anemones, ranunculus and gladiolus for bloom from late spring into summer.

* Plant blooming azaleas, camellias and rhododendrons. If you’re shopping for these beautiful landscape plants, you can now find them in full flower at local nurseries.

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