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Camellia City Porcelain Artists host annual tea


Sacramento Digs Gardening logo
Sacramento Digs Gardening
PUBLISHED OCT 4, 2021

Pink camellia

Camellias always are in season for the Camellia City Porcelain Artists, whose annual tea and show return this weekend. (Photo courtesy Camellia City Porcelain Artists) Shepard Center welcomes back 'Autumn Splendor' show and sale

It’s a Sacramento fall tradition – and now back at the Shepard Center.

This weekend, the Camellia City Porcelain Artists will host its 30th annual show and fall tea with the theme “Autumn Splendor.” Admission and parking are free.

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9 and 10, patrons are invited to sip tea, enjoy snacks and browse the show, packed with beautifully hand-painted creations.

“Enjoy complimentary snacks and drinks while viewing the art of traditional and creative works of hand-painted porcelain pieces from local artists,” say the organizers. “Christmas Tree raffle to benefit the Sacramento Zoo, hand-painted china for purchase and much more!”

The artists canceled their 2020 show and tea, due to pandemic precautions. Patrons to this weekend's event are asked to wear face masks (when not sipping tea or nibbling treats) and maintain social distancing.

Shepard Center is located at 3330 McKinley Blvd., Sacramento, in McKinley Park.

Details: www.sgaac.org .


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Your garden needs you!

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